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Myrtle Beach News

ARTICLE

Date ArticleType
3/12/2016 General
The Long Bay Symphony Orchestra Presents "Some Enchanted Evening" on Saturday, March 19, 2016, featuring Brodway performers Anne Runolfsson and Sal Viviano

Myrtle Beach, SC –Maestro Charles Jones Evans will lead the Long Bay Symphony (LBS) in a performance of a selection of classic songs from “The Great American Songbook.” The concert takes place on Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 7 pm at the Myrtle Beach High School Music and Arts Center.

Never out of style, these songs from well-known composers such as George Gershwin, Cole Porter, and Irving Berlin, have been recorded by artists from Bing Crosby to Bette Midler. This toe-tapping performance will have you singing along.

Guest artist Anne Runolfsson recently completed a 2 year run on Broadway as the tempestuous diva, Carlotta Giudacelli in Andrew Lloyd Weber’s Phantom of the Opera, the longest running show in Broadway history. Sal Viviano has appeared with over 120 Symphony Orchestras in Pops concerts around the world, with current bookings up to 2 years in advance.

Tickets range from $25 to $50. Student tickets (21 & under with student ID) are $10. For tickets call the box office 843-448-8379, purchase online at www.LongBaySymphony.com or visit us at 1107 48th Avenue N., Suite 310-E, Myrtle Beach.

Program Details
Dr. Charles Jones Evans, conductor
Carolina Master Chorale

Contact:
Jane Williams
843.448.8379
info@longbaysymphony.com
www.longbaysymphony.com

Interviews with Dr. Charles Jones Evans available.

Images Attached:
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Educational Programs
In addition to regular concerts, the symphony offers other educational programs for students, schools and the community since music is vital to maximizing a child’s full potential. Students who participate in the arts outperform those who do not participate on virtually every measure.1 The Long Bay Symphony’s Young People’s Concert and the Musicians in the Schools programs are designed to encourage students to join their school orchestra or band, further explore music, and eventually participate in the Long Bay Symphony Youth Orchestra.

In November each year, the Long Bay Symphony presents a Young Peoples Concert for fourth and fifth grade students from area schools to introduce symphonic music and the concert experience. The Musicians in the School program sends individual musicians into the classrooms of area elementary schools for an up close performance of symphonic music, look at the instruments and explanation of how the instruments make sounds and the types of music performed.

The Long Bay Symphony Youth Orchestra, founded in 1990, serves to further the music education, talent development and social experiences of 60 – 75 students. These talented young musicians, ages 9 through 22, are selected through auditions each August then rehearse weekly to prepare for three major concerts presented during the school year.

1 Center on Education Policy. (2006). From the Capitol to the Classroom: Year 4 of the No Child Left Behind Act, March 2006. (p. xi).
About The Long Bay Symphony
Founded in 1987, the Long Bay Symphony performs about 15 concerts each year in addition to fundraising events for other organizations. It is the largest performing arts organization in the Grand Strand area and the largest professional orchestra in the region. Musicians come from other professional orchestras, and local communities as well as Columbia, Charleston, Fayetteville, Wilmington, and beyond.

The mission of the Long Bay Symphony is to enhance the cultural and artistic environment of the Long Bay region by providing the highest quality musical performances and programs which entertain and educate patrons of all ages. A key component of its efforts is the educational programming for both young people and adults in the community. The symphony is supported about 35% by ticket revenue, with the balance from business and individual giving, foundation and municipal grants, and operating support from the S.C. Arts Commission.
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